Index – Lead With Your Customer, 2nd Edition:Transform Culture and Brand into World-Class Excellence

Index

A

accountability, 157

action, taking, 162–163, 225–226

Adobe Systems, 58–59, 95, 173

Adventist Health Celebration Hospital, 94, 145–146

concierge department, 158

example of attention to details, 145–146

Airbnb, 59

Alexa example of catering to particular styles, 29

Alston & Bird, 93

Alvarsson, Niklas, 142

American Express, 160

Analytical Graphics Incorporated, 93

Ancestry.com, 86

anticipating service needs. See “service netting”

Apple, 146, 155, 169, 170

artificial intelligence and bots

Alexa example, 29

American Express Advance Personalization Services example, 160

chat bots, 95–96, 159–160

task bots, 160

Turing Test, 160

Xiaolce, 159

attitude of excellence

Harley-Davidson, 60

Ritz-Carlton, 60

Southwest Airlines, 60–61

automotive industry example of delivering the brand promise, 126

Avis example of service improvisation, 135–136

A&W/Marriott example of managing by walking around, 30–31

B

Bain and Company, 104

Bangor Savings Bank (BSB), 216–221

Baradwaj, Deepak R., 96

Barber, Allison, 69

Basecamp, 113

beliefs and philosophies

Adobe Systems, 58–59

Airbnb, 59

Facebook, 59

Google, 58

IBM, 58

Red Frog Events, 59–60

TOMS Shoes, 59

benefits. See also compensation

as an employee retention strategy, 101

to consider offering, 103

customized work options, 92–93

Disney Difference compensation package, 107–109

effects of reducing, 105

time-saving on-site services, 92

unique, 104–105

Best Buy, 146

Bird, Brad, 55

Black Friday, 176–177

brand promise

brand-culture fusion, 188–189

communicating the, 121–122, 124–125

defining the, 122–123

delivering the, 125–126

differentiating the, 123–124

logos and branding, 124–125

maintaining the, 125

BT (formerly British Telecom), 193

C

Carlypso, 140

CarMax example of expectations, 24

Carvana, 140, 143

case studies

Adventist Health Celebration Hospital, 145–146

Bangor Savings Bank (BSB), 215–221

BT (formerly British Telecom), 193

CarMax, 24

Disney Vacation Club, 24–25

Federal Student Aid (FSA), 43–44

IKEA, 178–180

JetBlue, 115–116

Kerusso, 74

Kohler, 84

L’Oréal, 93–94

Marriott/A&W, 30–31

National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA), 25–26, 160–161

Nike, 28

Nordstrom, 75

Primera Engineers, 38

Umpqua Bank, 123

USAA, 31–32, 70–71

Walt Disney Company, 42–43, 57–58

Walt Disney World, 68

Walt Disney World Resort MyMagic+ initiative, 21–23

Wells Fargo, 187–188

Catmull, Ed, 214

chain of command, 91

Chain Reaction of Excellence Model, 3–6, 72, 209

change

choosing to lead with your customer, 226

the courage to create meaningful, 225–226

no-name, 224

vs. improvement, 223–224

chat bots, 95–96, 159–160

choices, providing, 155, 171

choosing to lead with your customer, 226

choreographed care, 133–134

Churchill, Winston, 60

Clough, Megan, 216

Cockerell, Lee, 12, 155–156

coffee example of the customer experience, 50

Cohen, David, 37

communication

chat bots, 95–96

customer guidance, 157

with employees, 94–95, 214–215

compensation. See also benefits; rewards and recognition

Disney Difference compensation package, 107–109

and organizational performance, 114

packages, 102–103

salary considerations, 101

unique benefits, 104–105

Container Store, 73, 75

core values and vision

criteria for developing values, 40

within the Customer Compass, 35–36

defining an organization’s vision, 40–41

developing your, 44–46

failing to integrate, 187–188

implementing your, 46–47

importance of understanding your, 36–37

operational values, 37–39

philosophical values, 37–39

Wells Fargo example, 187–188

Cornell University, 104

Corporate Culture and Performance (Kotter and Heskett), 37

cost. See price

courage, 227–228

Covey, Stephen R., 16–17

Cracker Barrel, 170–171

culture

brand-culture fusion, 188–189

building and supporting an organization’s promise, 56–58

“culture clues,” 87

customs and traditions, 62

employee attitude, 60–61, 113, 132

employee perceptions regarding, 56

employee research before joining an organization, 55–56

hiring talent that fits the, 67–68

implementing beliefs and philosophies, 58–60

initiatives to support corporate values, 56

language choice, 61

learning, creating a, 211

morale, 55

onboarding, 71–72

orientation programming to introduce, 68–71

using matrices to build employee, 194–195

workplace, 86

Customer Compass

concept overview, 13–15, 35–36

expectations, 23–26, 32

needs, 15–23

six Ps, 47–50, 105, 111, 175, 178–180, 186–187, 192

styles, 26–30

walk, 30–32

customer-focused behaviors

data-driven decision making, 129

efficiency, 129

fairness, 128

guidelines, 127–128

transparency, 128–129

Walt Disney Company example, 129–131

customer(s)

choosing to lead with your, 228

the customer experience, 50, 49, 132–136

effort, 176–177

emotional responses to products, 177

expectations, exceeding, 32

intangible price, 177–180

internal vs. external, 5–6, 35, 48–49

keeping existing, 197

listening to, 162

referrals, 197

sacrifices made, 177

satisfaction, 4

tangible price, 176–177

walking in the shoes of your, 30–32

customer service

attending to all the details, 189

bell-ringing examples of personalized attention, 134

choreographed care, 133–134

Give Kids The World example, 132–133, 145

integrity net, 188–195

making people feel special, 133

real service opportunities, 136–137

service improvisation, 134–136

customs and traditions

Google, 62

Southwest Airlines, 62

CVS, 134

D

decision making, 38, 45

DeSantiago, Michael F., 38

development and training

Container Store example, 73

as the key to corporate success, 72

low-cost ideas, 73–74

differentiation, 170–171

disengagement, 50, 106

Disney, Walt, 57–58, 83–84, 227

Disney Difference example of employee engagement, 107–109

Disney Leader Basics example of employee engagement, 65–66

Disney Vacation Club example of expectations, 24–25

Durant, Will, 224

E

effort, 176–177

Eisner, Michael, 84, 211–212

employee(s)

benefits, 92–93

concierge, 158

co-workers, attitudes about, 114

determining the value of employment, 111–116

empowering, 202–203, 213

engagement, 5, 8–9, 50, 65–66, 105–109

expectations, 26

frustrations, 89

improvement, continuous, 93–94

intangible price, 113–114

as internal customers, 5–6, 35, 48–49, 111–112

obligation to exercise leadership, 12, 66

perceptions regarding an organization’s culture, 56, 113

research before joining an organization, 55–56

retention, 101, 111–116

support, 66–67, 84–85

taking ownership of a situation, 156–157

tangible price, 112–113

The Encore Effect: How to Achieve Remarkable Performance in Anything You Do (Sanborn), 133

engagement, 5, 8–9, 50, 65–67, 105–109

Ericsson, 92

Evernote, 94

expectations

CarMax example, 24

Disney Vacation Club example, 24–25

exceeding customer, 32

held by employees, 26

National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA) example, 25–26

positive or negative, 23–24

Ritz-Carlton example, 23–24

The Experience Economy (Pine and Gilmore), 50

Eyring, Pam, 26, 186

F

Facebook, 59

fear, 225

Federal Student Aid (FSA) example of vision, 43–44

Florida Department of Transportation’s SunPass, 151

Ford, Henry, 32

Four Seasons, 70

France, Van, 43

Fried, Jason, 113

Frohwerk, Art, 95

frontline employees

ability to respond immediately, 202–203

customer-focused behaviors, 127–131

importance of, 137

individualizing customer service, 132–136

service recovery, 198–199

supporting people in building the brand, 132

Fuller, Buckminster, 88

Fusion: How Integrating Brand and Culture Powers the World’s Greatest Companies (Yohn), 189

G

Gardner, Joseph, 162–163

Gates, Bill, 98

Genentech, 92, 104

Gilmore, James H., 50

Give Kids The World example of customer service, 132–133, 145

the Golden Rule vs. the Platinum Rule, 20

Google, 58, 62, 86

H

Hampton Inn, 203

Harley-Davidson, 60, 133, 175

Harvard Business Review, 188

HCSS (software company), 94

Hello Fresh, 155

Heskett, James, 37

hierarchy, 91

hiring talent

interview questions, 67

transparency of candidates, 67

Walt Disney World interviewing process, 68

Holler & Dash, 171

Holmes, Ryan, 95

Home Depot, 152

Hootsuite, 95

human resources (HR)

customized work options, 92–93

employee retention, 101

and technology, 77–78, 95–96

time-saving benefits for employees, 92

Hurricane Maria example of providing support for employees, 66–67

I

IBM, 58

IKEA, 178–180

improvement, continuous

of employees, 93–94

for external customers, 160–164

of products, 172–174

Step 1–measure, 162

Step 2–act, 162–163

Step 3–remeasure, 163

Step 4–evaluate, 164

Step 5–celebrate and share, 164

improvements

choosing to lead with your customer, 226

the courage to create meaningful change, 225–226

no-name change, 224

vs. change, 223–224

individual styles

amiable, 29

analytical, 27

driving, 27–28

expressive, 28

observations regarding, 29–30

influence, 9–10, 12

In Search of Excellence (Peters and Waterman), 43

Inside the Box (Cohen), 37

integrity net

considerations, 192–193

matrix for a fitness club, 194

matrix for a people management process, 195

purpose of, 189

sample blank, 190

sample for a fitness club, 190

sample for a government payment center, 191

steps in building an, 193

Interaction Associates, 92–93

Ive, Jonathan, 169

J

JetBlue, 61, 66–67, 71, 86, 105, 115–116

Jobs, Steve, 23, 32, 170, 171

Jungle Boat ride example of supporting an organization’s promise, 57–58

K

Kaiser Permanente Roseville Medical Center, 152–153

Kalogridis, George, 90

Kamprad, Ingvar, 178

Kerusso example of service huddles, 74

Kohler example of employee support, 84

Kotter, John, 37

Kroc, Ray, 147

L

Landwirth, Henri, 132–133

language choice

JetBlue, 61

W. L. Gore & Associates, 61

Walt Disney Company, 61

leaders

personal, 11

positional, 11

role of, 162–163

spontaneous, 11

vs. managers, 8–9, 66

leadership development, 75

leadership excellence

Bangor Savings Bank (BSB) case study, 215–221

defined, 5, 9

as the driver of employee engagement, 8–9, 65–66

getting results, 209–212

influence and, 9–10, 12

qualities necessary for, 208

working effectively with others, 212–215

Le Moyne, Irve, 133

Lincoln, Abraham, 63

Lofy, Chuck, 122

Lofy, Mary, 122

logos and branding, 124–125, 171

L’Oréal, 93–94

loyalty

brand, 170–171

and employee benefits, 105

and long-term success, 4, 47

The Loyalty Effect (Reichheld), 3, 47

M

managers vs. leaders, 8–9

Mandela, Nelson, 10

mapping example of continuous improvement, 160–161

Marriott, J. Willard, 30–31

Marriott, Richard, 31

Marriott/A&W example of managing by walking around, 30–31

Marriott Hotels, 69, 168

matrices to reflect the customer experience, 194–195

matrix reporting style, 91–92

McDonald’s, 147

MD Anderson Cancer Center, 133

memories, creating tangible, 168–173

Merrill, David, 27

Merrill, Reid, 27

Methodist Hospital System, 104

Microsoft, 94, 104

Miliotes, George, 67

Millard, Nicola, 193

Milliken, 94

mistakes, learning from

documenting learning insights, 211

guidelines, 97–98

prison escape example, 96–97

understanding policies, 96–97

money, 177

Montgomery-Rice, Bob, 221

morale, 55, 212–213

Morton’s Steakhouse, 134

Musk, Elon, 32

N

National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA) example of expectations, 25–26, 160–161

needs

the need to be heard and understood, 16–17

the need to belong and contribute, 17–18

the need to feel significant and special, 19–20

the need to feel stable and in control, 18–19

the need to feel successful and reach your potential, 20–21

universal motivators, 15–16

Neeleman, David, 86

Netflix example of differentiating the brand promise, 123–124

New York City’s Department of Finance

customer-focused behaviors, 128–129

example of rewards and recognition, 77

Nike

catering to particular styles example, 28

employee communication example, 95

Norberg, Elizabeth, 65

Nordstrom

example of service huddles, 75

product displays, 147

returning a tire story, 150

Nunis, Dick, 43, 57–58

O

Oberle, Valerie, 211

Ogburn, Charlton, 223

onboarding

ideas, 71–72

JetBlue example, 71

purpose of, 71

one-stop solutions, 155–158

operational values

as a decision-making tool, 38, 45

defined, 37–38

examples (by organization), 39

vs. philosophical values, 37–38

organizational performance, 114

organizational structure

chain of command, 91

flattened hierarchy, 91, 214

matrix reporting style, 91–92

orientation programming, 68–71

ownership, having employees take, 156–157

P

Patagonia, 104

personal leaders, 11

Peters, Tom, 43

Phillips 66, 152

philosophical values

defined, 37

vs. operational values, 37–38

Pick n Pay, 133

Piggly Wiggly, 173

Pine, Joseph, II, 50

Pixar, 86

place

Adventist Health Celebration Hospital example of attention to details, 145–146

Carvana example of an optimized virtual and physical experience, 140

cleanliness, 147

importance of every detail, 145–146

medical center example of the importance of a work setting, 139–140

physical and virtual worlds, 140

product displays, 146–147

and sensory perception, 140–144

signage, 146

the Platinum Rule, 20

positional leaders, 11

potential, reaching your, 20–21

price

for an employee’s work experiences, 111–112

charitable aspects of, 178

cultural fit, 113–114

intangible, 113–114, 177–180

missed purchases, 177

organizational performance, 114

and status, 178

tangible, 112–113, 176–177

and value to the customer, 175

Primera Engineers example of philosophical and operational values, 38

Principal Financial Group, 92

prioritization, 38, 45

processes

common problems with, 149–150

communication with employees, 94–96

continuous employee improvement, 93–94

decreasing waiting time, 151–154

employee experiences, 89–90

giving the gift of time, 154–155

inefficient, 90–91

learning from mistakes, 96–98

offering one-stop solutions, 155–158

as opportunities to deliver the brand to the customer, 150

organizational structure, 90–92, 132

providing continuous improvement, 160–164

providing customers with choices, 155

requesting information once, 150–151

service recovery, 197–198

technology’s role in, 159–160

process improvement initiatives

Agile, 173

ISO 9001:2000, 172

Lean Manufacturing/TPS, 173

Six Sigma, 173

Statistical Process Control (SPC), 172

products and services

balancing choices and streamlining, 171

Butterball Turkey line example of product support, 172

continually improving, 172–173

Cracker Barrel example of quality vs. quantity, 170–171

creating tangible memories, 168–173

differentiation, 170–171

hospital pharmacy example, 167

hotel experience example, 167–168

process improvement initiatives, 172–173

product support, 171–172

providing superior, 170–171

quality vs. quantity, 170–171

visual design, display, and packaging, 169–170

promise, brand

communicating the, 121–122, 124–125

defining the, 122–123

delivering the, 125–126

differentiating the, 123–124

logos and branding, 124–125

maintaining the, 125

promoting from within, 58, 62

public-sector vs. private-sector businesses, 106

PWC, 104

Q

Qualcomm, 92

quality vs. quantity, 170–171

R

Rackspace Managed Hosting, 94

Red Bull, 86

Red Frog Events, 59–60

Redmoon, Ambrose, 225

Reichheld, Frederick F., 3, 47

responsibility vs. severity in service recovery, 199–201

results, getting

being resourceful, 210

building an engaged workforce while creating a great customer experience, 209–210

creating a learning culture, 211

creating and staying focused on your plate, 209

developing and executing your plan, 209–210

working hard, 211–212

retention, employee, 101, 111–116

rewards and recognition. See also compensation

impact of non-monetary rewards, 76

New York City’s Department of Finance example, 77

team database of preferred rewards, 76–77

Ritz, Cesar, 60

Ritz-Carlton

attitude of excellence, 60

example of effective service recovery, 202–203

example of expectations, 23–24

Ruby Receptionists, 104–105

Russell Investments, 92

S

Sanborn, Mark, 133

satellite example of customer expectations, 25–26

Scarbrough, Shelby, 17, 71

Schneid, Jacob, 5

Scripps Health, 104

sensory perception of the environment

memories and emotions, 140–141

sight, 141

smell, 142–143

sound, 142

taste, 144

touch, 143–144

service huddles

Container Store example, 75

Kerusso example, 74

Nordstrom example, 75

purpose of, 74

service improvisation

Avis example, 135–136

CVS Samaritan vans example, 134

Morton’s Steakhouse example, 134

“service netting”

integrity net, 188–195

making sure a problem doesn’t recur, 204

service mapping using matrices, 194–195

vs. service recovery, 185–186

service recovery

as an opportunity to develop a customer relationship, 199

empowering frontline employees to respond immediately, 203–203

Hampton Inn example, 203

handling by frontline employees, 198–199

internal, 204

low-cost or no-cost service ideas, 203

making sure a problem doesn’t recur, 204

processes, 197–198

as a reactive measure, 185

Ritz-Carlton example, 202–203

Service Recovery Matrix, 199–201

severity vs. responsibility, 199–201

vs. “service netting,” 185–186

The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People (Covey), 16–17

shirt return example of one-stop solutions, 157

silos

breaking down, 98

operating in, 90–91

six Ps

cheapening the product, 105

Customer Formula, 48–49, 111, 175, 192

IKEA example, 178–180

for internal and external customers, 48–49

JetBlue Call Center example, 115–116

key points, 186–187

overview, 47

skills

leadership traits, 8–10

managerial, 8

Smith, Brad, 67

Smith, Guy, 199

Snow, Dennis, 199

social intelligence, 26–30

social media

Disney Twitter real-time responses to customer questions, 158

L’Oréal example of improving employee engagement, 93–94

Southwest Airlines, 60–61, 62, 87, 113

spontaneous leaders, 11

Stankey, John, 95

Starbucks, 104

State of the Global Workplace (report), 50

streamlining, 171

styles

amiable individuals, 29

analytical individuals, 27

driving individuals, 27–28

expressive individuals, 28

Nike example, 28

observations regarding, 29–30

Social Style assessment, 27

support for employees

JetBlue during Hurricane Maria, 66–67

Kohler, 84

Walmart, 84–85

Sussman, Adam, 28

T

task bots, 160

TD Industries, 104

team meetings, 74–75

technology

chat bots, 95–96

design challenges in the virtual world, 170

Disney Twitter real-time responses to customer questions, 158

human resources (HR) opportunities, 77–78

L’Oréal example of improving employee engagement through social media, 93–94

mobile apps for saving time, 152

teleworking, 85, 93

Timbre example of drones in restaurants, 159

Telefónica Europe, 93

Tencent, 158

Teslasuit, 144

Tiffany & Co., 146

Timberland, 104

Timbre, 159

time

absences from an employee’s personal life, 113

decreasing waiting time, 151–154

giving employees the gift of, 92

paying for goods and services to save, 154–155, 176

work hours, 112–113

time-share example of defying expectations, 24–25

Time Warner, 95

TOMS Shoes, 59

Toyota, 173

training and development

Container Store example, 73

as the key to corporate success, 72

low-cost ideas, 73–74

trust, 122

Tudor, Kim, 30

U

Umpqua Bank example of differentiating the brand promise, 123

USAA

example of showcasing customers’ military experiences, 31–32, 70–71

four-day workweek, 113

V

Valero Energy, 92

values

and corporate success, 37

criteria for developing, 40

developing your core vision and, 44–46

failing to integrate, 187–188

implementing your core vision and, 46–47

operational, 37–39

philosophical, 37–38

Primera Engineers example, 38

vision

defined, 40

developing your core values and, 44–46

examples (by organization), 41

Federal Student Aid (FSA) example, 43–44

implementing your core values and, 46–47

vs. a mission statement, 40

vs. a “vision statement,” 40–41

Walt Disney Company “We create happiness” example, 42–43

visual design, display, and packaging, 169–170

Vitality: Igniting Your Organization’s Spirit (Lofy and Lofy), 122

Volkswagen, 86

W

W. L. Gore & Associates, 61

walk

executives’ frontline experiences, 31, 62

J. Willard Marriott example, 30–31

USAA example of showcasing customers’ military experiences, 31–32, 70–71

Walt Disney’s Disneyland visits, 57–58

Walmart, 85–86, 147, 152, 169–170

Walt Disney Company

“80 and Go!” strategy for action, 163

attention to details and anticipation of problems, 145

behaviors aligned with long-held values, 129–131

Disney Difference compensation package, 107–109

The Disney Institute, 211–212

Disney Leader Basics, 65–66

Disney Vacation Club example of expectations, 24–25

engineering division 510, 95

FastPass to save time in line, 151–152

language choice, 61

Smellitizer smell machine, 142–143

theme park “culture clues,” 87

“tip board” to indicate attraction wait times, 155

toy monorail example of providing one-stop solutions, 156, 157

Twitter real-time responses to customer questions, 158

Walt Disney’s Disneyland visits, 57–58

Walt Disney World fountain example of inefficient processes, 90–91, 98

Walt Disney World interviewing process, 68

Walt Disney World Resort MyMagic+ initiative, 21–23

“We create happiness” vision, 41–43

wheelchair line example of equitable waiting times, 152–153

workplace accommodations, 83–84, 92

Walton, Sam, 84–85

Waterman, Robert, 43

Watson, Thomas, Sr., 58

Wells, Frank, 211

Wells Fargo example of recalibrating to its core values, 187–188

Westin example of paying attention to the entire product package, 168

?What If!, 87

The Wonderful World of Customer Service at Disney (Kober), 42–43

working effectively with others

building morale, 55, 212–213

communication, 94–95, 214–215

empowering and involving people, 202–203, 213

flattening the organization, 91, 214

getting people to comply using hard-wiring vs. soft-wiring, 212–213, 224

knowing your customer, 212

working hard and working smart, 211–212

workplace optimization

break areas, 81–82

creativity and innovation, 86

“culture clues,” 87

employee support, 84–86

“front of the house” vs. “back of the house,” 82

garage origins of large corporations, 83

messages being conveyed about the workplace, 139–147

office resources, 82–84

Southwest Airlines example, 87

teleworking, 85

things that external customers should never see, 81

Walt Disney Company examples, 83–84, 87

?What If! example, 87

World Class Excellence Model

coffee example of the customer experience, 50

Customer Compass overview, 13–15, 35–36

expectations, 23–26, 32

needs, 15–23

of service recovery, 199–201

six Ps, 47–50, 105, 111, 175, 178–180, 186–187, 192

styles, 26–30

values, 37–40

walk, 30–32

X

Xiaolce, 159

Y

Yohn, Denise Lee, 189

Z

Zappos, 176

Zillow, 104